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Okonomiyaki (Japanese Pancake)

Okonomiyaki (Japanese Pancake)

I had some leftover cabbage that needed to be used and of course the first thing that came to mind was to make a okonomiyaki which is may favorite way to use up extra cabbage. Okonomiyaki is a savoury Japanese style pancake that is made with a batter, shredded cabbage and other grated vegetables. From there you can add meats or whatever else you want. In fact, okonomi translates to "as you like" or "what you want" so the pancakes can differ greatly between cooks. Once the pancake is done cooking it is topped with toppings such as mayonnaise, okonomiyaki sauce (like Worcestershire sauce only thicker and sweeter), katsuobushi (dried, fermented, and smoked skipjack tuna), etc. When you order okonomiyaki at a Japanese restaurant you are often brought the raw ingredients and you cook it yourself on a hot plate at your table. This way you get even more control to cook it "as you like".

When I make okonomiyaki at home I like to add grated seasonal vegetables to the batter such as carrots, pears, apples, sweet potatoes, squash, zucchini, etc. I like to place a couple strips of bacon on top which gets cooked when the pancake is flipped over. When making okonomiyaki I like to make one large pancake rather than making several smaller ones. I use my large non stick pan and when I flip the pancake I flip it onto a large plate, flip it onto another large plate and finally flip it back into the pan. (It sounds a bit complicated but it is much easier than trying flip that large pancake with a spatula.) After it is cooked I like to top it simply with the Japanese mayonnaise and the okonomiyaki sauce. You should be able to find both of these in a locale Asian grocery store. I quite enjoy these large savoury vegetable pancakes and they kind of remind me of large vegetable fritters.

Okonomiyaki (Japanese Pancake)

Japanese "as you like pancakes" are stuffed with vegetables, grilled until golden brown and topped with a tasty sauce along with mayonnaise.


Servings: makes 2 servings

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 30 minutes
Total Time: 40 minutes

Printable Recipe
Ingredients
  • 1 cup flour (I like to use whole wheat)
  • 3/4 cup dashi or water
  • 1 egg
  • 1/4 of a cabbage, about 2-3 cups packed, shredded
  • 1 carrot,grated
  • 1 small zucchini, grated
  • 1 green onion, sliced
  • 3 slices bacon
  • okonomiyaki sauce (or Worcestershire sauce) to taste
  • mayonnaise to taste
  • green onions to taste, sliced
Directions
  1. Mix the flour, dashi, egg, cabbage, carrot, zucchini and green onion in a large bowl.
  2. Heat some oil in pan.
  3. Pour in mixture and top with the bacon slices.
  4. Cook on medium heat until golden brown on both sides, about 5-15 minutes per side.
  5. Top with okonomiyaki sauce, mayonnaise and green onion slices.

Similar Recipes:
Okonomiyaki (Hiroshima Style) Kimchi Pajeon (Kimchi Pancake or Pizza) Greek Style Zucchini Fritters

144 comments:

Marta said...

kevin, I love this japanese wave you're into! This dish looks so great: exotic yet not intimidating, and very filling. Thanks!

Dinah said...

My teacher who is from Osaka, makes a mayonnaise-mustard-ketchup-soy sauce topping for her okonomiyaki. Sounds weird but is quite good.

Y said...

What a beautiful looking okonomiyaki :) I don't crave it, but have made it on occasion. Yours looks picture perfect.

Chow and Chatter said...

yum and great post learnt a lot thanks

Ninette said...

An Osaka couple taught me how to make okonomiyaki many years ago when I lived in Japan. Where's you're katsuoboshi? I love how it waves back and forth in the heat.

jordan said...

My jaw LITERALLY dropped when I saw this. And my eyes bugged out. I am not kidding. This looks AMAZING.

Helene said...

Another new dish to me. I love coming here and finding all these great meals you're doing. Beautiful!

Ann said...

Have seen the same in one of my pal's blog...yours look colorful and tempting kevin !!

Kerstin said...

I love how you're not afraid to tackle any type of dish! Your okonomiyaki looks delicious - I saw it for the first time on Natasha's blog and now I'm quite intrigued!

Cookin' Canuck said...

This is beautiful! I have never made this, but can't wait to try.

http://www.cookincanuck.com

Brittany (He Cooks She Cooks) said...

I've been seeing this around a lot lately. Yours looks great. I'll have to try it soon.

Cakebrain said...

You're on my wavelength, and now I'm expecting a Tako-Yaki recipe from you next! I have a little tako-yaki pan and have yet to use it! Your okonomiyaki looks so good!

Rosa's Yummy Yums said...

Amazing! Your omelet looks ever so beautiful!

Cheers,

Rosa

Skinnymum said...

Look so yummy.......will be making this for brunch tomorrow, can't wait. *giggle*

mirtilla said...

...buonissima...

HoneyB said...

This looks delicious!

Debbie said...

Your dishes never cease to amaze me. I'm always seeing a new, gorgeous dish. Looks wonderful Kevin!

Dawn said...

Now this is a great way to kick up a pancake. I have heard of this, but never saw one. I would love to try this at home. Can we eat the leftovers cold? lol

Joanne said...

This looks really good, kind of like a more versatile frittata (what with all the shredded fruit and veggie options). I bet it would be great with some jicama in it as well!

Sara said...

That is gorgeous, totally gorgeous. I love coming to visit your site, you make such wonderful and interesting dishes!

meeso said...

This really looks good, and a nice way to use up leftover vegetables and fruits here and there.

Justin said...

nice. i'm so crazy for okonomiyaki.

Jan said...

Mmmm Yum - LOVE the look of that pancake Kevin!

Karen said...

I've never heard of this... it looks like it would be very good.

Passionate Eater said...

What a delicious and savory panckae. I love the way that you describe okonomiyaki sauce as being like thick Worcestershire sauce, what an apt description!

Sippity Sup said...

I love these Asian flavors you have been on lately. This is very inspiring...a bit intimidating, but inspiring.

Tangled Noodle said...

This is fabulous! I often have a lot of leftover shredded cabbage from making another dish and never know quite what to do with it (other than just another stir fry). This is one to try immediately!

haleysuzanne said...

This is a great idea for cleaning out leftover veggies in the fridge! And since it's a glorified fritter, it has to be good.

The Cooking Photographer said...

I just learned something! I've never made okonomiyaki before. Did I even spell it correctly lol?

My Taste Heaven said...

Haha, so happen that I just had Okonomiyaki for my lunch. Now I am reading on the recipe about it. Thanks for sharing.

mycookinghut said...

I really have not tried this.. Looks good!!! You are a great cook!

Janet @ Gourmet traveller 88 said...

ooooh, this looks so yummy, I want to try this for some time but have not got round to make it yet, i should put this higher in my to cook list.

Lori said...

I tell yah Kevin I was looking for a recipe such as this the other day. This is exactly what I had in mind. I wanted something versatile. And this is versatility ten fold. You did a great job decorating this. It looks utterly amazing.

Elra said...

I never made the Japanese version of pancake, but I do love the Korean pancake. They are pretty similar, I think. I have the feeling That I am going to like this as well.
Have a wonderful one Kevin.
elra

Holler said...

What a great idea Kevin! I have never seen anything quite like that before, but the ingredients have me hooked :)

{lovely little things} said...

Yum! I've wanted to try making these since I saw them featured on Anthony Bourdain: Tokyo! Thanks for the recommendation, love your blog!

Dishesdone said...

That looks fantastic! I love cabbage. I'll have to try it!

Jenn@slim-shoppin said...

Kevin, I use that method of flipping when I make an omelette, so I could totally picture you flipping your pancake!

I love the picture, I've never made anything like that before. Wonderful!

Bobby said...

Great recipe, this looks really good. I love the presentation.

MaryBeth said...

Very interesting,I have never heard not seem anything like it before.

CORA said...

I've seen Japanese pancake in Japanese eateries before but never felt like choosing it. Your photo is so appetizing though. It really makes me want to give it a go!

Soma said...

I had made the veg. version, without dashi. & made my own asian sauce to top it. This looks fantastic.

Bren said...

i don't think i've ever heard of this! but i think i just love it! i have cabbage at home now that def. needs to be used up. i love how you're so creative!

Deborah said...

I've got some red cabbage that I need to use - I wonder if that would work...

Kirby! said...

I saw a recipe for okonomiyaki on 101 Cookbooks recently, and bookmarked it immediately! It looks so different from anything I've ever eaten. Your version looks REALLY yummy!

Street Foodie said...

Looks good. Just blogged about Takoyaki, which shares a few key ingredients with this stuff.

Natashya said...

I have had these once, in Toronto, good for you for making your own!

elly said...

I wish you would have posted this last week when I had some extra cabbage! What a great way to use it up.

Christie's Corner said...

I'm not a big fan of Japanese cuisine, but Okonomiyaki is one of the dishes I love. I've never attempted it, but this is changing my mind.

Kate said...

I love okonomiyaki! Made it last week and haven't managed to get it up yet. I found some fried pork belly to be a terrific addition, too.

Kevin said...

Dawn: I have enjoyed the leftovers cold. They are also good after a few seconds in a microwave.

Christelle said...

Hummm I'll have it, but without the mayonnaise :)

Spryte said...

I've never heard of this! It sounds so good. I often have leftover cabbage. I'll have to keep this in mind for later!

eatme_delicious said...

I looooooooove okonomiyaki! Yours looks super delicious. My favourite is at this local restaurant where they put gyoza in it. Mmm.

diva said...

u've definitely won my heart with this one. perfectly made!

Mark Garso said...

Looks interesting - never quite tried something like this. It will be a first for me!

Mark Garso

Jan said...

This reminds me of a British dish called "Bubble and Squeak." This is cabbage and other left over vegetables, and anything else you might want to add, fried into a kind of pancake. It doesn't look nearly so glamorous as it's Japanese counterpart but it tastes great. I will have to post about it sometime.

She'saPistol said...

Tried and LOVED it! I diluted some Hoisin sauce to loose ketchup consistency and found it to be an excellent substitute for the usual oko sauce.

Kevin said...

She'saPistol: Using the hoisin sauce is an good idea!

Janet said...

Kevin, is japanese mayonnaise different than Hellman's?

Kevin said...

Janet: It is a little different but the Hellman's will work just as well.

Mami said...

I am so surprised posting many people of the world about Okonomiyaki.And you learn very much about hou to make it. thanks for information about Japanese food.

Mami said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Okonomi_Yakity said...

Awesome looking Okonomiyaki and great photos - if you want to learn some more about other Okonomiyaki recipes and history, check out http://www.okonomiyakiworld.com

theapartmentkitchen said...

I love Okonomiyaki, so I tried your recipe - it was great!

Though not exactly traditional, I added a dipping sauce that I think you'd really like!

Thanks for the recipe!

Anonymous said...

I love okonomiyaki - but I always buy a mix to make the batter with. Real okonomiyaki is made partially with mountain yam powder, which is a weird tuber that smells like fish when raw. It lends a really unique texture to the batter and makes it easy to get the consistency right... you just can't substitute it with anything else. I like throwing some mochi on mine to go with the bacon.

Lεуδі Dυδυ said...

WOW ! WOW ! WOW !
Thank you !
That's great !
Keep it up !
Love it !

Natasha said...

I made it the other night and it turned out great! My old college roommate was from Osaka and she used to make these for us all the time. When we moved out, I found myself craving the pancake (I call it Japanese pizza) and searching the city for it w/ no success. Next time I think I will add small shrimp or squid pieces on top to give it some seafood flavor. Great recipe using ingredients found at local grocery stores.

I plan on trying a few more of your ideas soon :)

Anonymous said...

If you make this the Hiroshima way, you would add some Yakisoba to it... which is quite good but different.

Try adding some pickled red ginger on top also, or some Bonito flakes.
Tenkasu adds a nice bit of crunch on top.. thats basically the bits left over from Tempura batter

Anonymous said...

interesting, that looks delicious. your are the great cooks.

regards,

Nice blog, This is my first time visiting here.

regadrs,

Kenali dan Kunjungi Objek Wisata di Pandeglang

Cora said...

When I saw this recipe, I had to make it! I love cabbage. I tried something similar, though with different vegetables and a bit more egg in the batter link here and I referenced your post too. It was fabulous.

Kathleen said...

Zuchinni and carrots eh? Thats a western version of the japanese version!

I've went through many okonomiyaki restaurants in japan, but never seen a carrot and zuchinni one. I will try this, and they idea of grating them is interesting.

Interesting okonomiyakis out there in japan although most are unknown other than the traditional, shrimp, beef, pork, squid outside japan are cheese balls, popcorn kernels (that pop when you cook) just to name a couple.

To add more flavor, add a tablespoon of soy into the water, and/or powdered shrimp (dried tiny sakura shrimps heated on a pan then crushed into powder)and beni shoga strips (red ginger) on your preference.

And my latest one i had mayo mixed with basil sauce.A first on my part. Mmmm try that one.

and wheres aonori? the flaked seweed on the topping?

restaurantgroupie said...

can't wait to try this recipe! my partner and i love okonomiyaki so much, we call it "okonomiyummy"

alice said...

i really do love good okonomiyaki. so simple yet so delicious!

brannyboilsover said...

This looks great. It is my first time visiting the blog and the comments indicate it's a great place to be, so I'll be back!

niagaragirl said...

Wonderful! I got some great baby cabbages from the farmer so I'm going to give this a try!

Toety said...

I tried this today! I love it! I made some changes to make it suit my family n my tastebuds better.

http://sweetrings.blogspot.com/2009/11/d-i-y-okonomiyaki-japanese-pancake.html

Soooo easy & tasty.

Gonna try ur garlic mash tmr!

Thanks =)

Rookie Bebe said...

I had the instant mix version with dried bits of squid in it. A Japanese exchange student made it for us and we loved it. I've never had it since and never knew what it was called.
Can't wait to make this!!

LV said...

I went to Tokyo two weeks ago, and I learned that you can make OCTOPUS BALLS with okonomiyaki flour and an aebleskiver pan. Just a thought - it's practically the same thing, but round and with a chunk of octopus in the middle. I'm gonna give it a try, but I thought you might get a kick out of it too.

CarolinaDreamz said...

OH we'll have to try your version.. sounds very good.. the family would love to have it with bacon.

We've mastered HM Tonkatsu, that we love, though.. :)

~Heidi

Amy said...

A good friend of mine studied in Japan in the mid 90s and still talks about Okonomiyaki. I will have to make this for her! She will love it.

charlotte said...

Kevin, We made our version tonight. since my sister in law, who is Japanese was in charge, we used pork belly strips, same as bacon but not smoked, etc. We also made a veggie okonomiyaki and used bonito flakes on top. Both were amazing and so great for people that have specialized dietary needs.

Celia said...

I feel that "1/4 of a cabbage" is an incredibly imprecise measurement. Could you describe it in terms of volume by cup, or something?

Kevin said...

Celia: Sorry about that. This is one of those recipes that I usually just eye ball. I have added the cup units to the recipe.

Robyn said...

Wowzers! I just made mine with sweet ham, roast pork, shrimp and crab surimi with peppers and onions. Holy Socks! I'll totally be making this again! Your plate to plate to pan tip was EXTREMELY helpful! Thanks for sharing this!

Anonymous said...

ew meat

Anonymous said...

yo, i eat this shiz on the reg for eve's, what.

Bridget said...

My boyfriend and I made this last weekend and let me tell you, Oh my gosh!!! It was so good!!! And easy and healthy (minus the bacon).
We made it twice, the second time using up leftover crabmeat. My boyfriend had a hard time flipping it, so he made it into 4 smaller pieces and flipped those.
I can't believe I've never even heard of this until now. Thanks for sharing it!

Cat said...

Thanks for the recipe! I just made this for lunch and really enjoyed. We're veg so I left out the bacon and added a bit of soy sauce and topped with Thai chili mayo to compensate.

Jodi said...

Made this for dinner tonight - it was awesome! I've never had this before. Thanks for the recipe, this will definitely be in rotation.

bl00cloud said...

i flavored the batter a bit more by using garlic powder, a pinch of salt, and pepper. and instead of just water i used a pinch of chicken msg and water and soy sauce.

and then for sauce i tried sweet and sour sauce.

topping was sardines. haha.

thank you for the recipe. :]

Sneige said...

Very yummy!

Alexandra said...

That's looks amazing! I have a friend who travels to Japan twice a year and raves about okonomiyaki and takoyaki. By the way, I've seen a Japanese mayonnaise (looks like a baby bottle) but never brought myself to buy it, do you know if there's any difference between that and the "american" mayo?

Kevin said...

Alexandra: The wikipedia that Japanese mayo is generally made with rice wine vinegar or cider vinegar rather than distilled vinegar giving it a slightly different taste.

Alexandra said...

Thanks!

Flo said...

My mother was Japanese, so this is the kind of food I consider comfort food. We made our own variation of this due to the limited amount of true Japanese ingredients available when I was younger. Now, there are oriental stores that offer much variety. I had left over cabbage that didn't get used on St. Patrick's Day, so every time I saw that head of cabbage in the fridge, I thought of making Japanese pancakes. I modified a recipe and used a can of crab meat (juice and all) instead of the fish stock. They turned out really tasty. Like I said, comfort food for me!

Dirty Gourmet said...

My brother made this for me when he came back from living in Japan for 6 months. I was skeptical at first but it was delicious! Now I can make it for myself :) Mai-Yan

sagu's fantasy said...

yummy!! i love okonomiyaki.

Tran said...

My Japanese friends introduced me to this at a restaurant where they give you the ingredients and you cook your own at your table, so fun! And yummy.

I never even thought about giving it a try but your recipe inspires me to :)

They also said in Japan it's a popular late night food, after a night of partying.

Anne's Kitchen said...

I love, love, love Okonomiyaki! Gotta make some again soon, I'm craving some NOW! :)

Gourmet Free said...

hi Kevin!
what a beautiful Japanese pancake . it looks wonderful okonomiyaki's recipe is so yummy .it's presentation is so nice . i really try to make this.

Heather said...

Having lived in Osaka for awhile, I grew to love okonomiyaki. I like to throw an egg on to the grill while the okonomiyaki is on the plate and then put it on top of the egg. Hard to explain, but the result is quite tasty. I especially like to do the fried egg trick if I don't have any meat to make it more flavorful.

Elena said...

I've got absolutely to translate this recipe and try it!!!I'm sure this pancake is amazing

Goldielocks said...

mmmmmm...it looks very tasty:)i'm glad that i found your blog,it's awesome

crystal said...

Kevin, You're an amazing cook (and photographer)! I just bookmarked at least 10 of your recipes and I want to try them all! Thanks for the motivation!

Ikkin-bot said...

Have you ever tried the pre-made mix? They are actually pretty good. I discuss it on my blog:

http://ikkin-bot.blogspot.com/2010/06/okonomiyaki.html

Please disregard the fact that I burned that one . . . it has everything to do with my complacency with making okonomiyaki and nothing to do with the product

Claire said...

I just made this tonight...delicious! I'm a vego so I skipped the bacon, and I put in sweet potato (aka kumara and also ambiguously called a yam) instead of zucchini. I've eaten okonomiyaki before, and I know how yummy the sauces are, but because I'm trying to avoid filling my fridge with more condiments (there's no room left in the door, put it that way) we topped them with whole egg mayonnaise and smoky bbq sauce...unconventional but very moreish!

(In the ingredients, you list 1 green onion and also chopped green onion at the end - I interpreted this as meaning that the 1 green onion went into the mix, although the instructions don't mention it, and there is extra to garnish at the end. Well, at least, that's what I did and it worked out fine.)

Felix said...

What I like about this recipe is the "what you like" part. Because of this it transcends all borders of cooking and cultures because everyone can make their Okonomiyaki with their own personal touch. Thanks for this recipe. Will definitely try it.

Victoria said...

Hello; I absolutely love your blog, and THIS particular recipe got me to give cooking a go.
A friend took me to an okonomiyaki restaurant in Kyoto and it was one of my favorite foods during my entire trip to Japan!
I can get both sides of the okonomiyaki golden brown, but the inside is still mushy and doughy...any tips? (I'm a novice cook, if you couldn't tell).

MrsQ said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
MrsQ said...

Is the Japanese mayo spicey? I've never tried it. I've yet to go to the local asian store which is a few miles away, but any favorite brand that you like above the others?

Kevin said...

Victoria: If you are finding that the inside does not finish cooking you can try making them thinner and or cooking at a lower temperature for longer.

MrsQ: The main difference between the Japanese mayonnaise and North American Mayonnaise is that it commonly uses either rice wine vinegar or cider vinegar rather than distilled vinegar so there is only a minor flavour difference and it is not spicy. My favorite brand is the Kewpie brand that comes in a squeezable bottle so that you can get those nice thin lines as seen in the photo.

Suzanne said...

Your Okonomiyaki came out just beautiful! This is my absolute favorite Japanese dish, and is very hard to find. I make my own too. I have used a Gluten Free pancake mix called Pamela's for the batter and it turned out great. (Don't forget the egg...) There is a restaurant in San Francisco called Izumiya (in the Japan town Shopping center http://www.sfjapantown.org/ that makes this and it is amazing. If your readers have not made this yet, they MUST! It is really not that hard. I have had Oko parties before where we kind of eat as we cook.

Stacie Shepp said...

What a delicious version of a pancake. We are fond of Japanese flavours and pancakes of all sort so this recipe sounds like one we'll be enjoying soon. Thank you!

livemylifebetter said...

love this JP pancake!!! grt blog/ loving the food and recipes!

yUkiaaa said...

thats really looks nice, i would want to eat it agen!! xx

Distilled said...

This recipe reminds me of my time at University. I have a friend who spent a year in Japan and came back with this recipe, as students the idea of mixing vegetables with bacon and pancake was something which blew our tiny little minds.

then again, he also came up with the ultimate "morning after the night before" breakfast:

Naan bread, grilled with cheese, bacon and an egg on top. Smothered in either tomato sauce or baked beans. Culinary win.

awkward annie said...

I <3 this recipe ~ thanks for sharing!

Aurelia said...

I've never heard of okonomiyaki before but that looks really nice. Thank you for sharing the recipe, I'll be sure to try it out later this month :)

The Food Hound said...

Very unique recipe!! Just wanted to say that I made and blogged about your Greek Pulled Lamb! It was delicious-- check it out!! (http://food-hound.blogspot.com/2010/12/greek-system-lamb-and-tzatziki.html)

Wendy @ Obesebaby said...

Searching for the perfect Okonomiyaki recipe. Nice post and nice pic, planning to make this over weekend. didn't know I can use a broth instead of water. Thanks!

bawwa said...

wht the process to be your assistant.
u rocks dude.
namste

Anonymous said...

Hello,

Thanks for posting this recipe. I found it a few weeks ago and we made it at home. Not only is it delicious -- it's becoming one of our standbys when we have odds and ends of vegetables that we need to use.
Thanks!

Maggie WIlliams said...

Happy Valentines Day! I made this today for my honey for breakfast. Delicious! I have been wanting to make it since reading the recipe some time ago. Today it was the perfect way to start the day. Mine did not look as beautiful as your photo shows but this is one I will be making often and changing up the ingredients to use what ever we have on hand. Thanks for the inspiration and great "new to me" recipes!

Kate Ramos said...

Looks delicious and a great way to use up leftover cabbage! Yum!

Anonymous said...

Did you know your recipe and photo are being copied? http://healthrecipes.com/okonomiyaki-japanese-style-pancake.htm

Kevin said...

Anonymous: Thanks for the heads up!

Girliest Nerd said...

I made this on a whim and at all points in the cooking process I wasn't particularly excited about it. However, I then tasted it and just have to say it was FANTASTIC.

I can't believe I never knew of a recipe like this before but this is something I'll make over and over, with many different ingredients for the rest of my life. Thank you for introducing it to me!

BIG SPOON said...

whoa - so surprised to fin this here. i just got back from a trip to japan and we had okonmiyaki twice - once in tokyo and once in hiroshima. did you know that every region has its own versions? the one in tokyo was okay, but in hiroshima they were awesome - buckwheat pancake topped with cabbage and noodles, fillings of choice, egg, sauce, scallions, ginger..... whoa. we went to a 4 story building where every floor was only Okonomiyaki stalls. i took a lot of pictures and described it in a post on my blog under the Japan tag. check it out if your interested

Constant Erratic said...

I can't believe how many recipes you write up that contain ingredients that I use regularly. I use cabbage in all kinds of ways, but putting it in a pancake sounds brilliant! I obviously live under a rock, haha.

Anonymous said...

Awesome. Made this the other day and wish I had more now. I love okonomiyaki, and this was a great and easy intro to get me started making it myself.

RCTI Online said...

Wow, it's very delicious food from japan.

Nenou said...

After my early post about eggs
a. I have to admit I didn't know about this delicious okonomayaki

b. Now I know and I am making it for lunch.

Keep on,
N.

Hallie Ann said...

Sucess! Loved how this turned out and will be making this again. I didn't have dashi on hand, just used water, but I hope to use dashi next time. Thank you for a great recipe!

Anonymous said...

Erhmehgerd!!! Pregnant and had a massive craving for this. Turned out well and fit the bill nicely - searched, cooked and bolted down within 20 minutes

Nueyer said...

Haha.... that's exactly how I "flip" the pancake too! No skill to do the proper flip =p

Anonymous said...

Can't wait to try this recipe for something different as a side, and to get my husband to eat cabbage. How much oil should I use in the pan to fry these?

Steve said...

We make this every now and then. Thank you for your ace recipes, you have often been a dinner-oriented lifesaver! :)

Deandria Montgomery said...

From the first moment I had okonomiyaki, it was a love hate relationship. I loved the concept, but hated the way it tasted. Through trial and error, I found the perfect combination. I made the pancake as usual, but mixed green onion in and topped it with cheddar along with bacon, the sauces. I also make one with smoked bacon and sweet corn. I reserve the bulk of the bacon for the top, but having a little mixed in it tasty.

Aina Waldner said...

I make Swedish pancakes in a variety of ways. Happen to have left over cabbage and the other ingredients as well. I'm going to top the pancake/frittata with rice noodles and some delicious sauce left over from sweet and sour meatballs I had the other day. Garnish with green onion for presentation. Can't wait to see and taste! Thanks for all the ideas, folks!

Aina Waldner said...

I make Swedish pancakes in a variety of ways. Happen to have left over cabbage and the other ingredients as well. I'm going to top the pancake/frittata with rice noodles and some delicious sauce left over from sweet and sour meatballs I had the other day. Garnish with green onion for presentation. Can't wait to see and taste! Thanks for all the ideas, folks!

Nance said...

I make this and sub. finely shredded peeled potato for some of the flour, and add a bit fish sauce for flavoring since I don't have dashi. Red ginger shreds and nori shreds are great in/on it, too.

Kevin Lynch said...

Nance: Good call on the fish sauce!

Greta said...

Yum! This sounds amazing! I just posted a recipe about kimchi pancakes that a friend said reminded her of okonomiyaki so I had to check it out! As soon as I can get some great veggies from the farmer's market this is going on the list!

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